For Those Who Think Machines Think They Can Think (by Paul W. Smith)

IBM-Watson

Thinking has always been an ethereal thing.  It is the most private of human activities, and while the expression “I know what you’re thinking” is part of the lingua culturae, it is a bold-faced lie.  Notwithstanding crypto-keys and blockchains, the only truly protected storage place in the universe – at least for now – is the thought-swarm deep within our respective skulls.

Brains themselves are fascinating stuff, and no one is quite sure what’s in there.  This is important, since a vessel of chemicals and tissue generating a cluster of electrical activity is one thing, but that which we call consciousness is quite another.  Physicist/Neuroscientist Paul Nunez wrestled with this, building a foundation of scientific facts with which to construct some reasonable theories.  Science also warns us, he notes, that some things are fundamentally unknowable. 

Philosophers, who spend considerable time thinking about thinking, have had a lot to say about the subject.  One of the most influential philosophical works, Discourse on Method (1637) by René Descartes, not only gave us the Cartesian coordinates that we scientists have come to love, but also introduced the discipline of Methodic Doubt.   Doubting things methodically led René to the conclusion that he could not doubt his own existence since after all he was the one doing the doubting.  The coup de grâce for self-doubters was the legendary “Cogito, Ergo Sum”, aka “I Think Therefore I Am.”

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ProfiTap's Network Superheroes (by Tony Fortunato)

ProfiTap contacted 12 network analysts and had them put their ProfiShark product through its paces. Then the analysts wrote about their specific experiences, feedback and general thoughts.

I read through the pdf's and was intrigued as to what people wrote about and enjoyed hearing from different perspectives.

I personally think the end result was a great mix of articles that i think you would enjoy.

Here's a very brief summary along with the links:

Mike Pennacchi “Measuring Device Latency with the ProfiShark”

  • Mike shows us how to use the SPAN mode of the ProfiShark while determining and comparing the latency introduced by a Microtik configured to use NAT.
  • Very cool to see Mike sharing the methodology behind his testing.
  • youtube.com/watch?v=gMXBhNP9JJs
  • http://www.nps-llc.com

Stuart “Thor” Kendrick In-line Tapping in the Data Center”

  • Stuart takes us through his trials and tribulations while adding another VLAN to an ISILSON cluster.
  • Impressed with the level of detail and photos Stuart provides walking me through ProfiShark Manager and his specific connects.
  • Liked that Stuart used another tool ‘mass-ping’ for his troubleshooting.
  • http://www.skendric.com

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LMTV LIVE | How To Diffuse The IT Blame Game (with Keith Bromley and Scott Peerbolte)

 

 

LIVE EVENT START TIME : 9:30 AM PST, Wednesday, June 27th, 2018

6a00e008d95770883401b8d2e041f0970c-800wiThis week we will be talking with Keith Bromley (from Keysight Technologies, formerly Ixia) and Scott Peerbolte (of Corvil) about how you can help break down silos and reduce the blame game that are common for most IT departments. 

For instance, how well do your IT departments communicate with each other?  

Enterprises typically contain four or more IT sub-departments (Security, Network Operations, Virtual DC, Capacity Planning, Service Desk, Compliance, etc.) and it’s quite common for them to be at odds with each other, even in good times. For instance, there’s often contention over capital budgets, sharing resources, and headcount. But let’s be generous. Let’s say that in normal operations things are usually good between departments. What happens if there’s a breach though, even a minor one? Then things can change quickly. Especially if there are problems with acquiring accurate monitoring data for security and troubleshooting areas. Finger pointing can quickly result. 

So, what can you do? One answer is to create complete network visibility (at a moment’s notice) for network security and network monitoring/troubleshooting activities. Join us on this podcast to learn how.

Some key thoughts we will discuss during the event:

 

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Network Visibility - The Rise of the Aggregation Layer (by Greg Zemlin)

Network Visibility - The Rise of the Aggregation Layer

Sole reliance on SPAN ports for network visibility and monitoring has been on the decline for years. IT teams realize the inherent limitations of SPAN ports and have shifted in favor of the traditional 3-tiered approach to network visibility.

Tier 1: Physical Layer TAPs Network Test Access Points (TAPs) are hardware tools that allow you to access and duplicate network traffic. TAPs supply full line rate traffic and are never oversubscribed or rate limited. The egress traffic from the TAPs is then sent to NPBs.

Tier 2: Network Packet Brokers Network Packet Brokers (NPBs) are responsible for efficiently funneling data from network TAPs and SPAN ports to each tool. NPB’s were originally designed to replicate traffic for multiple tools while reducing the volume of traffic to each tool, ensuring each tool operates as efficiently as possible. This is typically done through a combination of aggregation, replication and L2-L4 filtering. The groomed, tool specific traffic is sent out for processing.

Aggregating Traffic

Tier 3: Tools Tools are responsible for processing and characterizing traffic of interest. Common tools are built for application performance monitoring, security, and data forensics.

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Wireshark Quick Tip - Opening Two Traces At Once on Mac OS (by Chris Greer)

Hey packet people!

If you are a Mac user and you need to do a side-by-side analysis of two trace files using Wireshark, this video will show you how. I got this tip from Mr. Gerald Combs himself. Thanks Gerald! 

Just wanted to post this in time for Sharkfest next week. You know, so you can follow along with the instructor while comparing a trace from your environment.

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