Network Visibility - The Rise of the Aggregation Layer (by Greg Zemlin)
ProfiTap's Network Superheroes (by Tony Fortunato)

LMTV LIVE | How To Diffuse The IT Blame Game (with Keith Bromley and Scott Peerbolte)

 

 

LIVE EVENT START TIME : 9:30 AM PST, Wednesday, June 27th, 2018

6a00e008d95770883401b8d2e041f0970c-800wiThis week we will be talking with Keith Bromley (from Keysight Technologies, formerly Ixia) and Scott Peerbolte (of Corvil) about how you can help break down silos and reduce the blame game that are common for most IT departments. 

For instance, how well do your IT departments communicate with each other?  

Enterprises typically contain four or more IT sub-departments (Security, Network Operations, Virtual DC, Capacity Planning, Service Desk, Compliance, etc.) and it’s quite common for them to be at odds with each other, even in good times. For instance, there’s often contention over capital budgets, sharing resources, and headcount. But let’s be generous. Let’s say that in normal operations things are usually good between departments. What happens if there’s a breach though, even a minor one? Then things can change quickly. Especially if there are problems with acquiring accurate monitoring data for security and troubleshooting areas. Finger pointing can quickly result. 

So, what can you do? One answer is to create complete network visibility (at a moment’s notice) for network security and network monitoring/troubleshooting activities. Join us on this podcast to learn how.

Some key thoughts we will discuss during the event:

 

  • A Visibility Architecture is an end-to-end infrastructure which enables physical and virtual network, application, and security visibility
  • The basis of a visibility architecture starts with creating a plan. Instead of just adding components as you need them at sporadic intervals (i.e. crisis points), step back and take a larger view of where you are and what you want to achieve. 
  • Here are some examples of how you can increase network visibility and eliminate some of the pitfalls:
  • Add taps to replace SPAN ports. Taps are set and forget technology which means that you only need to get Change Board approval one time to insert the tap and you are done.
  • Add a network packet broker (NPB) to eliminate most of the other Change Board approvals and eliminate crash carts. The NPB is situated after the tap so you can perform data filtering and distribution whenever you want. By implementing a tap and NPB approach, you may be able to reduce your MTTR times by up to 80%.
  • Add an NPB to perform data filtering. The NPB performs data filtering to send the right data to the right tool whenever you need it. This improves data integrity to the tools and improves time to data acquisition.
  • Add an NPB to create role-based access to filters. This eliminates the “who changed my settings” issue and allows multiple departments to share the same NPB.
  • Add virtual taps to get access to the often hidden East-West data in a virtual data center or cloud network
  • Add actionable intelligence from Corvil so stakeholders can explore details with dashboard correlations, filters, timeframe comparisons and even trace the intelligence back to the source data

If you can’t make it to the event, watch the podcast on-demand or check out some of these free resources.

 

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